Technology and social media can easily make today’s students seem more sophisticated and worldly than at any previous time. However, there is a big difference, as you well know, between appearance and substance. In today’s episode I talk about a great insight from Evelyn Waugh and how it can help us reveal the compassion of Jesus to even our most challenging students.

Transcript
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Well, Hey everybody, Jonathan DOR with you.

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Once again, welcome to the Catholic teacher daily podcast.

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If this is your first time of this is your hundredth time.

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Welcome a board.

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Thanks for what you're doing and the great adventure of Catholic education.

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Such a crucial time has so much happening in our world.

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You, uh, you turn on that news for just a couple of minutes and, uh,

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just so much going on in our world, a turmoil, a lot of turmoil around.

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Identity isn't there.

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Around, uh, Identity identity politics, identity groups.

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I remember reading Tom Holland's phenomenal book.

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About the, sort of the growth of Christianity and part of its great

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genius was that the holy spirit was able to kind of unite these

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diverse people, groups, this idea of.

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You know, man and woman, Greek Scythian, slave free.

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All these different identity groups became one in Christ.

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Jesus.

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So the great.

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Uh, the great sort of gift of Christianity.

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One of the great gifts of Christianity, especially in that, uh, late era of the

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Roman empire was its ability to unify.

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Let's not forget that, huh?

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Because there's so much that seeks to fragment and tribalized us at the moment.

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Then one of the great things we can do as Catholic teachers is to help young people.

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Understand that they have this.

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Much deeper identity.

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There's much deeper vocation as a child of God.

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And this concept of being a child of God, obviously transcends skin color.

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It transcends gender.

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It transcends everything.

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We are first and foremost, loved sons and daughters of our father in heaven.

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So, um, let's pray for, in a renewal of that realization in these challenging

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times and a little bit on that.

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I want to share with you.

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Today's quote, of course, if you're not getting the daily quote, please come

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And you will find plenty of places or there, you can just pop your details in

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Cause I know that you all want more email, right?

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daily quote to encourage you.

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So let's share that quote.

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This comes from the inimitable.

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Oh.

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Is like that word, regular listeners know I have favorite words.

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Yesterday.

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I talked about Jetta Daya Jenkins kept saying it as many times as possible.

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Today, we're going to talk about the inimitable, the incapable of

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And many of you would know everyone war of course, is the author.

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Of, uh, Brideshead revisited, which I enjoyed reading a few years back.

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So Evelyn Moore is a.

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A very famous Catholic author, but listen to this quote here, it's challenging

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at first till you get to the end.

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So listen up, it says this the trouble.

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With modern education is you never know how ignorant people are.

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With anyone over 50, you can be fairly confident.

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What's been taught and what's been left out.

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But these young people have such an intelligent, knowledgeable surface.

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And then the crust suddenly breaks.

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And you look down into depths of confusion.

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You didn't.

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No.

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Existed.

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I really liked that.

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I think there's a lot in it.

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I think it is true.

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You know, you meet someone over 50 and you can figure out usually in a few

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moments, um, kind of, you know, their take on life and, uh, their education level.

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You could pick all that stuff up pretty quickly just to a conversation.

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But what Evelyn was pointing out here is that often with young people,

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there's a sophistication these days.

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Coming through probably a huge amount of exposure to technology and social

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media that they can seem awfully.

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Uh, self-assured I'm sure, probably we did too.

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As, as teenagers, it's part of the journey of, uh, identity development, identity

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growth in that crucial period of life.

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But, uh, what Evelyn was pointing to is that underneath that is a great fragility.

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And I think that's true and I hope you'll agree that it's true.

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And I'm sure you've seen it.

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Uh, you know, for many years, my focus was boys education and.

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When I was first teaching, I was became kind of the go-to guy for

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other staff with, you know, dealing with really difficult students.

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We had one student many years ago.

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Who, uh, you know, not unusual for young boys, you know,

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struggled with managing anger.

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And he got so angry that he punched a wall and broke both hands.

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Punched a wall with both hands at the same, broke both hands.

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And I remember being called, you know, to come and help with him

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a few weeks after that happened.

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And, uh,

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And talking with him and just seeing him break down and cry, you know,

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that fragility that was there that was underneath this hard, hard exterior.

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So I think this is an important reminder for us from Evelyn war.

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Here's that last bit again, suddenly the crust breaks and you look

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down into depths of confusion.

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You didn't know existed.

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Oh my gosh.

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If I was a young person these days, It's it's understandable.

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You could be confused, right?

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The amount of stuff coming at them around identity and what they're supposed

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to be passionate about and the causes they're supposed to be following and the

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virtue they're supposed to be signaling.

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There's a lot going on there.

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So, what I'm getting at is that it makes it so precious what you're

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doing as a Catholic teacher.

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You know, you're not there to change their mind necessarily

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on a whole bunch of things.

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And as you know, you're definitely to indoctrinate.

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But you are there to tell the truth.

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It was a beautiful quote.

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I was reading yesterday from father John harden, part of the.

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The cross of carrying our daily cross, as Jesus said, we would have

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to is being witnesses to the truth.

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You know, Jesus made it very clear that anybody wanted to come after

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him had to pick up their cross.

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And follow him.

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So what's the cross.

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Well, I think at this moment in history for Catholic teachers, one of

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the crosses is truth is the ability to speak the truth into difficult,

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challenging circumstances and realities.

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And that might mean that just gently speaking the truth of

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identity into young people's lives.

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You know, maybe through moments of prayer, maybe through moments of scripture,

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reminding them, reminding them, reminding them of who they are and whose they are.

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Uh, what a counter cultural thing that is that there's this moment in history.

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Isn't it?

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That we can remind young people of who they are and whose they are.

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So friends, that's it for me today.

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I'm just hoping that the holy spirit will empower you to be on

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the lookout for that fragility.

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When that crust might break with the occasional student window that.

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That, uh, you know, when that sort of hard surface breaks away and you see this.

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Fragile young person inside didn't Jesus have a massive heart for young people.

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I mean, how counter-cultural was that?

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You know, Jesus is whole.

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Uh, focus on children on women was so counter-cultural in first century,

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Palestine, really, you know, the fact that he wanted to be with children that he, uh,

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That he wouldn't let people send them away.

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And as I said yesterday, whatever Jesus does is important.

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Whatever the gospels revealed to us about his character means that he's

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teaching us through the gospels.

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So if Jesus had a huge focus.

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On the preciousness of children, then he's telling us that he wants

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us to have that same focus too.

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So listen, thanks for what you're doing every day as a Catholic educator.

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I know you think it's hidden and sometimes you think nobody notices.

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But, uh, God does.

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And I do, and I'm really grateful for what you're doing.

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So that's it for me today.

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Hit that subscribe button.

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And um, i hope it's a blessing to you my name is jonathan doyle friends god

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bless you this has been the catholic teacher daily podcast and i'll have